Identifying Evidence Gaps in Secondary Education

Identifying Evidence Gaps in Secondary Education

Research by 3ie, supported by MacArthur and Mastercard Foundations through the PSIPSE, identifies evidence gaps in the application of transferable skills programs in low- and middle-income countries. Transferable skills provide youth with critically needed tools for success in employment, health, and personal well-being. The scoping paper and report reveal needs for evidence in several categories, including teacher training programs and curriculum reform, learner-centered teaching, and institutional management and capacity building.

Community, Family Support Critical in Girls' Education

Community, Family Support Critical in Girls' Education

A Population Council report examines the experiences of girls entering secondary education in Gujarat, India, with a focus on the lack of supportive family, school, and community environments. The report finds that poor academic performance is linked to teacher absenteeism, requirements that girls work in the home, and low aspirations and expectations for girls’ education among the girls and their families. 

Assessing Reasons for School Dropout in Uganda

Assessing Reasons for School Dropout in Uganda

A report by the International Center for Research on Women examines the factors that contribute to girls ages 14-18 dropping out of school in West Nile, Uganda. The report finds that more than 50 percent of girls in the region state that economic factors were primarily to blame, and pregnancy is the second most frequent response given (13.1 percent) for why girls left school. The report contains recommendations for how governments and communities can ensure girls remain in school, including comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education. 

A Dearth of Women Teachers in Rajasthan, India

A Dearth of Women Teachers in Rajasthan, India

A PSIPSE-funded study from the Education Research Unit shows there is a paucity of women math and science teachers in Rajasthan, India. The study points to social perceptions that math is beyond the inherent capabilities of girls, which leads to a low number of female math and science students at the college level and, in turn, results in few female teachers. The study urges attention to the issue and emphasizes the need for elimination of gender and social disparities in primary and secondary education in India.

Improving Learning Outcomes for Children Worldwide

Improving Learning Outcomes for Children Worldwide

A report by the Learning Metrics Task Force offers recommendations for a holistic and innovative framework to help countries and international organizations measure and improve learning outcomes for children and youth worldwide. The Task Force, convened by UNESCO and the  Brookings Institution's Center for Universal Education, outlines how the measurement of learning outcomes can help to ensure quality education and calls for a shift in global focus and investment from universal access to "access plus learning." 

Assessing Existing and Needed Research in Secondary Education

Assessing Existing and Needed Research in Secondary Education

As many developing countries see a boom in secondary education enrollment, effective, evidence-based policies on post-primary education are of vital importance. The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) has launched a Post-Primary Education Initiative  to promote policy-relevant research on secondary, tertiary, and vocational education in developing countries. As a first step in this process, J-PAL has released a report that reviews evidence to date on post-primary education and highlights gaps in the literature, with a focus on identifying policies that should be given the highest priority for future research. The review is organized in two broad topics: the demand for education from students and parents and the supply of education from governments and private providers.

Five Strategies: Corporate Efforts to Improve Global Education

Five Strategies: Corporate Efforts to Improve Global Education

Scaling up corporate and social investments could improve education in the developing world, according to this policy paper by the Center for Universal Education at Brookings. The paper looks at what works and what is not working in corporate efforts in developing countries and proposes five effective strategies for the business community to achieve the greatest impact in global education. Read the policy paper.  

Global Compact on Learning

Global Compact on Learning

A report by the Brookings Institution's Center for Universal Education calls for a global policy agenda that focuses on access to quality education and learning for all children and youth in the developing world, especially poor girls who are often left behind and remain at a disadvantage.

The report estimates that 65 low- and middle-income countries are losing approximately $92 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same standards as boys, and a 12 percent reduction in world poverty could be achieved if all students in low-income countries obtain basic reading skills in school.

Listen to a panel discussion about the report.

Download Global Compact on Learning and Global Compact Outcomes

 

Harnessing Corporate Philanthropy to Educate the World's Poor

Harnessing Corporate Philanthropy to Educate the World's Poor

While American corporations contribute nearly half a billion dollars per year to education in developing countries, corporate philanthropy to education generally does not reach the most poor and marginalized, according to a report by the Center for Universal Education at Brookings,  The Center conducted in‐depth interviews with corporate philanthropy leaders and surveyed nearly 150 U.S. companies.  The report suggest specific opportunities to achieve greater impact in educating the world’s poor through corporate philanthropy. View the report